Category: Outdoors

Heading to the Beach?

For all those lucky enough to be hitting the beach this summer, I wanted to again pass along this potentially life-saving information. According to the US Lifesaving Association, about 80% of all beach rescues are because of rip currents. These narrow channels of water move at speeds of up to 8 feet per second and can extend 200 to 2,500 feet lengthwise. You may have heard of them referred to as “riptides” or “undertow”, but no matter what you call them, they can be extremely dangerous and are the beach’s number one killer. Rip currents are created when water is pushed toward the shore and then forced sideways by incoming waves. That water then moves along the shoreline until it finds a way back into the ocean or open lake water. Most commonly, they occur on the East, Gulf and West coasts of the US as well as the Great Lakes. They can happen quite suddenly, which makes them particularly dangerous as they catch beach goers off guard – a swimmer can quickly go from taking a quick dip close to shore to suddenly being pulled out to sea at speeds of up to 5 miles per hour. Before you dip your toes in the water, please memorize this Rip Current survival graphic released by the NOAA, pictured below. Remember, the best way to survive is to NOT try to swim to shore. The currents are too strong for even the strongest of swimmers to fight and will just wear you out, which is what leads to most drownings. The best thing to do is to swim sideways, parallel to the beach. This will get you out of the currents path. If you can’t swim sideways, don’t panic! Let the current pull you along until you can feel the water get calmer. Again, swim sideways out of it and head back to shore or signal for help so a lifeguard can help get you back to the beach. Also make sure you check out the pic on how to best identify a Rip Current from the beach. It’s the area between the two arrows.

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Yeti’s Brand Museum Opens In Austin This Week

Yeti’s Brand Museum Opens In Austin This Week
Cooler maker Yeti is finally going to have a real-life presence, but it will be far from a traditional retail store. The company is opening a “brand museum” in their hometown of Austin, Texas, this week. Customers will be able to buy coolers and other Yeti gear there, but the main goal of the space is to be an “immersive Yeti experience”, according to Marketing VP Corey Maynard. “It’s our version of Disneyland,” says Maynard, explaining that they want visitors to have fun with the Yeti brand and see it brought to life in the three-dimensional world. The Yeti spot is located in a historic building that has it’s own interesting story about surviving the elements – it is the only building on the block to survive a 1935 flood and even has the high-water line marked throughout the store. Instead of having shelves stuffed with Yeti products, though, the space is filled with displays and exhibits. For instance, the boating exhibit features a skiff built by angler fisherman Flip Pallot to navigate the shallow waters of Florida’s Hells Bay. It sits in a body of water made from resin and has taxidermy fish, shrimp, crabs and other creatures of the everglades. One of the displays that sounds like a lot of fun is called “Yeti Vs.” which includes video clips of various catastrophes that Yeti coolers have survived. They get dropped from cliffs, blown up and even set on fire. The flagship store also has a bar, which is dubbed The Barrr, which features a music stage, and several decorative live sharks and tarpons suspended from the ceiling. Customers will also be able to customize their Yeti schwag while at the store. For those not familiar with the company, Yeti is best known for its insanely popular coolers and insulated travel mugs. Two brothers launched the company in 2006 with their “Sherpa” coolers, which were priced at between $250 to $300 a pop, or about 10x what an average Coleman cooler would run you. Current models can run as high as $1,000 depending on the size. They latched on to a pretty brilliant marketing plan – the coolers are grizzly-proof, and are even certified as such by the Interagency Grizzly Bear Committee. What they are really selling though is a lifestyle, a love of all things outdoors. The brand really caught fire with the so-called hook and bullet crowd – fishermen and hunters. The brothers initially set out to design a high-end fishing rod and came up with the coolers because they wanted something that could withstand some of their own personal exploits. Primarily, one they could stand while sight-casting for redfish. Sales hit about $29 million by 2011 with the primary marketing tool being word of mouth between other outdoor sporting fans. That spread to other markets soon enough, including oil workers and the hardcore barbecue circuit. The company last reported sales figures from 2015, which were nearly $500 million. Yeti is expected to go public sometime this year and is privately estimated to have a valuation of around $5 billion. (Source: Inc., CoCreate)

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