Category: Summer Fun

How To Pick The Perfect Watermelon

With all of the fresh watermelon hitting the market, I thought it would be good to review a few tips about how to pick just the right one. A few of our readers happen to be some of the largest watermelon producers in the U.S. and have passed along a few inside tips through the years. I was certainly doing it all the wrong way when I was younger. On a side note, one of my first real jobs, outside of throwing hay, was unloading semi trucks full of watermelons. Lets just say for a period of time in my life, I didn’t even want to see at another watermelon. Picking up watermelon and putting them down softly inside boxes and containers fro 12-hours straight will give you a whole new perspective on things. It’s even more exciting when there are snakes from the field still alive in the haul. Those where the days… (Source: Preview photo credit O.Bellini, Shutterstock; fifteenspatulas.comthekitchn.com)

White Field Spots – Many folks view the melons that have the big white areas as a problem. That’s not really the case, these are just field spots where the watermelon rested on the ground and are very natural. I fact some melons with just a shade of field spotting can be some of the best tasting. You don’t necessarily want the ones with the white spot, but more of a creamy-yellow or orangish-yellowish area can be best… so go for the “gold”. 

Webbing – Many folks don’t like to picking a watermelon with “webbing”, the brown crusting spiderweb like lines that are often on mellon. Interestingly, the “webbing” on a watermelon can help tell how many times that bees touched the flower. Many sources believe the more pollination, the sweeter the watermelon. 

Shape – It is beloved that the taller and more elongated watermelons are a bit more watery, while the more rounded and stout are perhaps a bit sweeter. 

Size Matters – In this case bigger doesn’t always mean better. Most experts say an “averaged size” watermelon gives you the best odds at getting great taste. Not too big or not too small. 

Tail – The tail of a watermelon can often indicate its ripeness. A green tail can mean the melon was picked a bit too soon and might not taste as good. The melons with the dried tails can make for a better taste. 

Color – Some folks believe color matters. Saying a perfect, ripe watermelon should be a darker green in color and dull in appearance, rather than shiny. A shiny watermelon can have a tendency to be under ripe.

Thump – This how my grandpa always checked his watermelons, but through the years I’ve heard a few conflicting thoughts on the sounds. Most agree that you want a more full sound when you thump the belly of the mellon. If the mellon sounds or feels somewhat hollow it’s defiantly not one to take home to the family.

This is just a small excerpt of the full Van Trump Report that I send out every day. To find out what you’re missing, sign up for a FREE 30-day trial.

For All You Thrill Seekers

Cave of the Winds Mountain Park near Denver, CO might have the rise all of you thrill seekers have been chasing. This park is located in the Williams Canyon, which is in Manitou Springs and about 75 miles south of Denver. This park was mainly used for cave tours before they started adding the “thrill rides”. The one most recently added is called the “Terror-dactyl”. It’s called this because the ride is absolutely terrifying and launches you similar to how a prehistoric bird would fly. People brave enough to jump on the ride will be launched 200 feet through the Williams Canyon traveling at speeds up to 100 mph. People say the most alarming part of the ride is the long free fall drop at the beginning. Unfortunately, there are a few requirements for the ride, including being at least 48 inches tall and between the weight of 100-250 pounds. Looks like the big men are going to have to sit this one out. From what I understand, not only are the rides crazy cool, but I here it’s a very scenic park as well. The caves at the park are said to be over a million years old, yet only first discovered in 1869 by a Colorado settler, named Arthur Love. The park was started soon after by two brothers, George and John Pickett, in 1881. This park has many different cave tours, rides, and obstacle courses. Check out the park pics below and the video HERE to watch this crazy ride. Possibly another great summer trip with the kids!

This is just a small excerpt of the full Van Trump Report that I send out every day. To find out what you’re missing, sign up for a FREE 30-day trial.


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